Son of Five Rivers Blog

For the advancement of Entrepreneurship, Sustainability & the Ecology of Everyday Life

Microinsurance for the Poor

Tsunami insurance for the poor

A new health insurance plan will enable the poor in India to buy health insurance for less than 10 cents a month, and it will cover natural disasters including Tsunamis.

The new program is a partnership between and aid group, CARE International, and a private insurer, Allianz. It is expected that over 200,000 customers will buy insurance within a year. According to Allianz, the communities have been involved in designing the new policies, which will cover death, medical treatment for injuries in accidents, help with funeral and hospital expenses, as well as paying wages during illness.

“Microinsurance provides a comprehensive measure of social security in an area which desperately needs this sort of protection against accidents and shocks that can push poor communities right to the limit,” said Wolfgang Jamman, national director of CARE Germany.

But don’t be so quick in calling this charity work. With an estimated market of 250 million policy holders in India, there sure is a buck or two to be made.

Posted by Alan Pereira (World Bank Private Deveopment Secotor Blog)

August 29, 2009 Posted by | Business, Business Model, Community Economic Development (CED), Creativity, Economics, Government, Philanthropy | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Best Province to do Business in Canada

Small business is a driving force in in British Columbia’s economy, employing over one million people and making up 98 per cent of all B.C. business.

  • In 2007, 98 per cent of all businesses in B.C. were small businesses, employing over one million people.
  • 46 per cent of all employment in B.C. is generated by businesses with fewer than 50 employees or self-employed workers.
  • Approximately 379,700 small businesses were operating in the province last year.
  • From 2002-07, the number of small businesses in B.C. grew by 8.8 per cent or by approximately 31,150 businesses.
  • Over 56 per cent of British Columbia’s private sector jobs are with small business – the highest rate in the country.
  • British Columbia’s small business GDP accounted for a third of total provincial GDP – the highest of all provinces.
  • 36 per cent of the self-employed in British Columbia were women – the second highest rate in the country.
Statistics related to small business are available at:
BC Stats
Data Services
553 Superior St.
Box 9410 Stn Prov Govt
Victoria, B.C. V8W 9V1
Telephone: 250 387-0327

What is the size distribution of small businesses? The majority of small businesses in British Columbia are micro-businesses with fewer than five employees. In 2007, there were 314,200 such businesses comprising 83 per cent of the province’s small businesses. Of these, 58 per cent were operated by self-employed persons without paid help and the remaining 25 per cent employed one to four individuals.

Over the past five years, the province’s small business count expanded by an average of 6,000 per year or 1.8 per cent.1 The fastest-growing group in British Columbia’s small business sector has been businesses with five to 19 employees, which grew at an average annual rate of 3.2 per cent, with an average net addition of 1,500 new businesses per year. In terms of actual numbers, most of the new businesses were in the self-employed without paid help category, which grew an average of 2.7 per cent or 5,200 businesses each year over the five year period. Despite the overall increase in the number of small businesses, there were declines in some size categories. Businesses with one to four employees averaged a net loss of -0.6 per cent or 600 businesses per year, while those with 20 to 49 employees experienced an average net loss of -0.8 per cent or 100 businesses per year.

  • Small Business – There were approximately 379,700 small businesses operating in British Columbia in 2007. These operations accounted for 98 per cent of all businesses in the province. Micro-businesses, with fewer than five employees each, comprised 83 per cent of small businesses.
  • Small Businesses Per Capita – In 2007, British Columbia had more small businesses per capita than any other province with 86.7 small businesses per 1,000 people. Long-time leader Saskatchewan ranked second among provinces with 86.6 small businesses per 1,000 people followed by Alberta with 79.7.
  • Employment – Approximately 1,048,000 people were employed by small businesses in British Columbia in 2007. These jobs accounted for 56 per cent of private sector employment in the province, the highest rate in the country.
  • Employment Growth – Between 2006 and 2007, small business employment in British Columbia grew by 2.5 per cent, slightly faster than the national rate of 2.4 per cent.
  • Self-Employed – On average, the self-employed tend to be older, are more often men and are more likely to work longer hours than paid employees. Thirty-six per cent of the self-employed in British Columbia are women, the second highest rate in the country.
  • Gross Domestic Product – Among Canadian provinces, British Columbia had the highest proportion of Gross Domestic Product (approximately 33 per cent) attributed to small businesses.
  • High Technology Sector – Small businesses constituted about 96 per cent of employers in the high technology sector. In 2007, there were approximately 8,225 small businesses in the high technology sector.
  • Regional Focus – The Kootenay and Thompson-Okanagan regions had the highest rates of growth in self-employment over the last five years at 27.3 per cent and 24.9 per cent respectively.
  • Exports – Small businesses in British Columbia shipped approximately $12.2 billion worth of merchandise to international destinations in 2006, almost 37 per cent of the total value of goods exported from the province.

August 29, 2009 Posted by | Business, Business Model, Economics, Finance, Government | , , | Leave a comment

Business ER Hotline


Business BC Launches “Business ER Hotline”:

Economic Climate a Hot Topic for Small Business Sector

Vancouver – Small Business BC (SBBC) has launched the “Business ER (Emergency) Hotline” providing BC’s small businesses with the solutions and business strategies to deal with the current economic conditions.

The Business ER Hotline, 1-800-667-2272, will enable SBBC to quickly address and respond to crisis-related business issues.

In addition to a 1-800 number, clients can ask questions and access information via email, or they can go to the Business ER Hotline website, www.smallbusinessbc.ca/businessER, or visit the SBBC Vancouver office in person, 601 West Cordova Street.

SBBC Consulting CEO, George Hunter, explains the reason for launching the Business ER Hotline: “Our staff has noted a significant increase in questions relating to changes in the economy.  For example, people want to know what kind of training programs are available for upgrading skills, or, which sectors are showing promise for new business opportunities, such as BC’s healthcare sector.  There are many people newly out of work who are now exploring the idea of starting a business.”

SBBC also reports an increase in questions regarding financing options and business strategies for tougher economic times such as how to cut expenses and build revenue, as well as a significant number of inquiries regarding labour standards.

“The Business ER Hotline offers a direct way to get timely information out to business owners and their employees as well,” says Hunter, “The small business community is important to our economy and SBBC is pleased to be able to provide a link to current information and provide support as small business owners navigate a changing economic landscape.”

Hunter encourages small business owners to contact SBBC via the Business ER Hotline, or go to their website, www.smallbusinessbc.ca, to find out more about the comprehensive services SBBC offers, such as financing options and sources, government acts and regulations, one-on-one business counseling, market research and consultation, business planning services, business seminars, e-business information and an education and resource centre

August 29, 2009 Posted by | Ads, Blogging, Brochure, Business, Business Development, Business Model, Creativity, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Government, Grants, Great Ideas, Human Resources, Investment, Marketing, Micro Credit, Packaging, Products, Sales, Services, Venture Capital | , , , | Leave a comment

The Sustinable Purpose of this Recession

9spotmonk photo

August 28, 2009 Posted by | Economics, Sustainability | | Leave a comment

If the World were a Village of 100

Logo Miniature EarthThe idea of reducing the world’s population to a community of only 100 people is very useful and important. It makes us easily understand the differences in the world.
There are many types of reports that use the Earth’s population reduced to 100 people, especially in the Internet. Ideas like this should be more often shared, especially nowadays when the world seems to be in need of dialogue and understanding among different cultures, in a way that it has never been before.

The text that originated this webmovie was published on May 29, 1990 with the title “State of the Village Report”, and it was written by Donella Meadows, who passed away in February 2000. Nowadays Sustainability Institute, through Donella’s Foundation, carries on her ideas and projects.

IF THE WORLD WERE A VILLAGE OF 100 PEOPLE

In the world today, more than 6 billion people live.
If this world were shrunk to the size of a village of 100 people, what would it look like?

59 would be Asian
14 would be American (North, Central and South)
14 would be African
12 would be European
1 would be from the South Pacific

50 would be women, 50 would be men
30 would be children, 70 would be adults.
70 would be nonwhite, 30 would be white
90 would be heterosexual, 10 would be homosexual

33 would be Christians
21 would be Moslems
15 would be Hindus
6 would be Buddhists
5 would be Animists
6 would believe in other religions
14 would be without any religion or atheist.

15 would speak Chinese, Mandarin
7 English
6 Hindi
6 Spanish
5 Russian
4 Arabic
3 Bengali
3 Portuguese
The other would speak Indonesian, Japanese,
German, French, or some other language.

In such a village with so many sorts of folks, it would be very important to learn to understand people different from yourself and to accept others as they are. Of the 100 people in this village:

20 are underonurished
1 is dying of starvation, while 15 are overweight.
Of the wealth in this village, 6 people own 59% (all of them from the United States), 74 people own 39%, and 20 people share the remaining 2%.
Of the energy of this village, 20 people consume 80%, and 80 people share the remaining 20%.
20 have no clean, safe water to drink.
56 have access to sanitation
15 adults are illiterate.
1 has an university degree.
7 have computers.

In one year, 1 person in the village will die, but in the same year, 2 babies will be born, so that at the year’s end the number of villagers will be 101.

If you do not live in fear of death by bombardment, armed attack, landmines, or of rape or kidnapping by armed groups, then you are more fortunate than 20, who do.

If you can speak and act according to your faith and your conscience without harassment, imprisonment, torture or death, then you are more fortunate than 48, who can not.

If you have money in the bank, money in your wallet and spare change somewhere around the house, then you are among the richest 8.

If you can read this message, that means you are probably lucky!

(The statistics were derived from Donella Meadows “State of the Village Report” first published in 1990)

The Original Report

July 26, 2009 Posted by | Agriculture, Clean Energy, Co-op, Community Economic Development (CED), Earth, Economics, Education, Family, Inspiration, Life, Not for Profit, Open Source, Social Enterprise, Social Media, Solar, Sustainability, Sustainable Community Development, Videos, Waste, Water | , , | Leave a comment

Translating the world’s information with Google Translator Toolkit

It’s amazing some of the things these folks do.  If you need to translate anything use Goole Transalator and teh Translator Kit.

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/06/translating-worlds-information-with.html

July 18, 2009 Posted by | Economics | , | Leave a comment

One Laptop Per Child (OLPC)

Children with the XO

Children with the XO

Children with the XO

Give a Laptop, Change the World! www.laptop.org

If this is new to you?

Watch the video here, or you can read the mission statement below: http://media.laptop.org/realmedia/Brandandmission.mp4

Mission Statement: To create educational opportunities for the world’s poorest children by providing each child with a rugged, low-cost, low-power, connected laptop with content and software designed for collaborative, joyful, self-empowered learning. When children have access to this type of tool they get engaged in their own education. They learn, share, create, and collaborate. They become connected to each other, to the world and to a brighter future.

And an Update for the followers:

July 16, 2009 Posted by | Books, Economics, Information Technology (I.T.), Inspiration, Life, Open Source, Politics, Sustainability, Videos | | 1 Comment

Top 100 Corporations

04.08.09, 06:00 PM EDT

Because you should just know this information…

Rank Company Country Industry Sales ($bil) Profits ($bil) Assets ($bil) Market Value ($bil)
1 General Electric United States Conglomerates 182.52 17.41 797.77 89.87
2 Royal Dutch Shell Netherlands Oil & Gas Operations 458.36 26.28 278.44 135.10
3 Toyota Motor Japan Consumer Durables 263.42 17.21 324.98 102.35
4 ExxonMobil United States Oil & Gas Operations 425.70 45.22 228.05 335.54
5 BP United Kingdom Oil & Gas Operations 361.14 21.16 228.24 119.70
6 HSBC Holdings United Kingdom Banking 142.05 5.73 2,520.45 85.04
7 AT&T United States Telecommunications Services 124.03 12.87 265.25 140.08
8 Wal-Mart Stores United States Retailing 405.61 13.40 163.43 193.15
9 Banco Santander Spain Banking 96.23 13.25 1,318.86 49.75
9 Chevron United States Oil & Gas Operations 255.11 23.93 161.17 121.70
11 Total France Oil & Gas Operations 223.15 14.74 164.66 112.90
12 ICBC China Banking 53.60 11.16 1,188.08 170.83
13 Gazprom Russia Oil & Gas Operations 97.29 26.78 276.81 74.55
14 PetroChina China Oil & Gas Operations 114.32 19.94 145.14 270.56
15 Volkswagen Group Germany Consumer Durables 158.40 6.52 244.05 75.18
16 JPMorgan Chase United States Banking 101.49 3.70 2,175.05 85.87
17 GDF Suez France Utilities 115.59 9.05 232.71 70.46
18 ENI Italy Oil & Gas Operations 158.32 12.91 139.80 80.68
19 Berkshire Hathaway United States Diversified Financials 107.79 4.99 267.40 122.11
20 Vodafone United Kingdom Telecommunications Services 70.39 13.30 252.08 93.66
21 Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Japan Banking 61.43 6.38 1,931.17 53.63
22 Procter & Gamble United States Household & Personal Products 83.68 14.08 138.26 141.18
23 CCB-China Construction Bank China Banking 42.98 9.45 903.35 119.03
24 Verizon Communications United States Telecommunications Services 97.35 6.43 202.35 81.04
25 Petrobras-Petróleo Brasil Brazil Oil & Gas Operations 92.08 14.12 120.68 110.97
26 Nippon Telegraph & Tel Japan Telecommunications Services 107.02 6.36 179.95 59.07
27 EDF Group France Utilities 89.46 4.73 278.76 71.53
28 IBM United States Software & Services 103.63 12.34 109.53 123.47
29 BNP Paribas France Banking 107.96 4.20 2,888.73 29.98
30 Bank of China China Banking 40.10 7.70 817.84 105.04
31 Telefónica Spain Telecommunications Services 80.70 10.57 129.16 85.56
32 Nestlé Switzerland Food, Drink & Tobacco 103.01 16.91 97.12 118.99
33 Sinopec-China Petroleum China Oil & Gas Operations 154.28 7.43 100.41 93.50
34 Crédit Agricole France Banking 107.75 5.90 2,064.17 21.91
35 Siemens Germany Conglomerates 108.76 8.05 128.46 44.18
36 Hewlett-Packard United States Technology Hardware & Equip 118.70 8.05 109.63 69.57
37 Intesa Sanpaolo Italy Banking 50.56 10.58 835.15 31.43
38 Bank of America United States Banking 113.11 4.01 1,817.94 25.29
39 Honda Motor Japan Consumer Durables 120.27 6.01 124.98 44.32
40 BBVA-Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Spain Banking 56.51 6.99 747.99 27.56
41 ArcelorMittal Luxembourg Materials 124.94 9.40 133.09 26.80
42 Johnson & Johnson United States Drugs & Biotechnology 63.75 12.95 84.91 138.29
43 ENEL Italy Utilities 82.92 7.37 177.21 31.00
44 UniCredit Group Italy Banking 83.72 8.70 1,482.98 18.37
45 Generali Group Italy Insurance 118.39 4.26 546.50 21.35
46 France Telecom France Telecommunications Services 74.50 5.67 125.32 58.92
47 Samsung Electronics South Korea Semiconductors 104.42 7.87 99.47 45.82
48 Deutsche Bank Germany Diversified Financials 124.78 9.47 2,946.88 14.40
49 Microsoft United States Software & Services 61.98 17.23 65.79 143.58
50 Pfizer United States Drugs & Biotechnology 48.30 8.10 111.15 83.03
51 Wells Fargo United States Banking 51.65 2.66 1,309.64 51.28
52 BHP Billiton Australia/United Kingdom Materials 59.47 15.39 72.40 96.65
53 StatoilHydro Norway Oil & Gas Operations 93.38 6.20 82.42 53.30
54 Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Japan Banking 46.06 4.62 1,114.89 25.56
55 China Mobile Hong Kong/China Telecommunications Services 47.09 11.49 76.42 175.85
56 Goldman Sachs Group United States Diversified Financials 53.58 2.32 884.55 42.06
57 RWE Group Germany Utilities 66.16 3.56 127.64 33.68
58 Roche Holding Switzerland Drugs & Biotechnology 42.75 8.41 69.77 98.47
59 Commonwealth Bank Australia Banking 34.98 4.58 467.83 28.01
60 Société Générale Group France Banking 99.25 2.80 1,572.73 17.77
61 Novartis Switzerland Drugs & Biotechnology 42.01 8.30 73.22 82.97
62 E.ON Germany Utilities 120.74 1.76 215.15 47.44
63 Deutsche Telekom Germany Telecommunications Services 85.89 2.07 162.51 52.96
64 Rosneft Russia Oil & Gas Operations 46.99 11.12 77.40 34.07
65 Mizuho Financial Japan Banking 42.29 3.12 1,545.23 21.46
65 Sanofi-aventis France Drugs & Biotechnology 38.40 5.36 96.01 67.84
67 National Australia Bank Australia Banking 41.87 3.58 515.83 21.90
68 Royal Bank of Canada Canada Banking 30.01 3.52 575.21 34.29
69 Cisco Systems United States Technology Hardware & Equip 39.58 7.49 61.36 85.05
69 Rio Tinto UK/Australia Materials 54.26 3.68 88.25 39.42
71 Tesco United Kingdom Food Markets 93.85 4.21 59.80 37.50
72 China Life Insurance China Insurance 26.20 5.32 127.83 83.26
73 Mitsubishi Corp Japan Trading Companies 60.43 4.64 117.84 20.89
74 Vale Brazil Materials 30.75 9.28 79.26 66.14
75 Munich Re Germany Insurance 64.20 2.09 291.87 24.29
76 Lukoil Russia Oil & Gas Operations 66.86 9.51 59.14 26.62
77 Barclays United Kingdom Banking 59.82 6.40 2,947.84 11.15
78 Banco Bradesco Brazil Banking 39.97 3.26 194.51 26.75
79 Unilever Netherlands/UK Food, Drink & Tobacco 56.44 7.00 48.75 58.24
80 BASF Germany Chemicals 86.77 4.06 69.41 25.62
81 Nokia Finland Technology Hardware & Equip 70.63 5.55 52.29 35.32
82 Sony Japan Technology Hardware & Equip 88.89 3.70 124.12 17.12
83 CVS Caremark United States Retailing 87.47 3.21 60.96 37.46
83 Daimler Germany Consumer Durables 133.43 1.88 180.08 21.21
85 United Technologies United States Conglomerates 58.68 4.69 56.47 38.53
86 Saudi Basic Industries Saudi Arabia Chemicals 40.62 5.87 72.39 31.44
87 Iberdrola Spain Utilities 35.09 3.98 114.81 32.42
88 Nissan Motor Japan Consumer Durables 108.46 4.83 119.00 14.14
89 Panasonic Japan Technology Hardware & Equip 90.87 2.82 71.85 28.93
90 MetLife United States Insurance 50.99 3.21 501.68 15.10
91 Westpac Banking Group Australia Banking 25.90 3.05 346.22 31.40
92 GlaxoSmithKline United Kingdom Drugs & Biotechnology 35.55 6.72 52.67 79.06
93 Morgan Stanley United States Diversified Financials 62.26 1.71 658.81 21.00
94 Telecom Italia Italy Telecommunications Services 41.97 3.08 117.81 23.82
95 Intel United States Semiconductors 37.59 5.29 50.72 70.86
96 Zurich Financial Services Switzerland Insurance 32.35 3.04 325.04 19.60
97 Mitsui & Co Japan Trading Companies 57.50 4.11 97.15 17.12
98 Comcast United States Media 34.26 2.55 113.02 37.62
99 AXA Group France Insurance 156.95 1.28 936.92 19.47
100 Bayer Group Germany Chemicals 45.85 2.55 71.39 36.97

June 14, 2009 Posted by | Business, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Finance | , , , | Leave a comment

Favorite Website: TED


TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from those three worlds. Since then its scope has become ever broader.

The annual conference now brings together the world’s most fascinating thinkers and doers, who are challenged to give the talk of their lives (in 18 minutes).

This site makes the best talks and performances from TED and partners available to the world, for free.

www.ted.com

June 14, 2009 Posted by | Agriculture, Business, Business Development, Co-op, Community Economic Development (CED), Economics, Education, Email, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Information Technology (I.T.), Social Media, Sustainability, Sustainable Community Development, Videos, Water, Website | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Guy Kawasaki – The Art of the Start

Great video for anyone wanting to start a business.   For you Business or IT Geeks, or even Mac users, you’ll know who he is.  He’s a Venture Capitalist, a true Entrepreneur and has several books and a popular blog that’s powered by WordPress as well 😉

June 14, 2009 Posted by | Business, Business Development, Economics, Education, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Videos | , , , , , , | Leave a comment