Son of Five Rivers Blog

For the advancement of Entrepreneurship, Sustainability & the Ecology of Everyday Life

This Site has Moved to SonOfFiveRivers.com

Click Here to Vist NEW Site: www.SonOfFiveRivers.com

I’ve been blogging for several months now and I’m glad to have recieved the feedback I have.  I’ve enjoyed the experince and for that reason I’ve decided to take blogging to another level.  I’ll be self hosting my blog and that means you’ll see a lot more creativity in the design, functionality and layout of the new blog.

Check it out: www.SONofFIVErivers.com

Cheers

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January 22, 2010 Posted by | 1, A Thought, Ads, Agriculture, Art, Blogging, Books, Brochure, Business, Business Cards, Business Development, Business Model, Carbon Credits, Clean Energy, Co-op, Community Economic Development (CED), Computer Networking, Construction, Creativity, Data Recovery, Definitions, Earth, Economics, Education, Electric Cars, Email, Entrepreneurship, Family, Finance, Geothermal, Government, Grants, Great Ideas, Green Roofs, Human Resources, Information Technology (I.T.), Inspiration, Investment, LEED, Life, Marketing, Micro Credit, Not for Profit, Open Source, Packaging, PDA's, Philanthropy, Photography, Politics, Power Piont, Products, Project Management, Quotes, Sales, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Services, Social Enterprise, Social Media, Solar, Sustainability, Sustainable Community Development, Taxes, Venture Capital, Videos, War, Waste, Water, Website | Leave a comment

Why all Construction should be LEED

December 8, 2009 Posted by | Construction, LEED | 1 Comment

2010 Emerging Trends in Real Estate – Price Waterhouse Coopers

http://issuu.com/cfives5/docs/2010_emerging_trends_in_real_estate

November 25, 2009 Posted by | Business, Construction, Economics | Leave a comment

LEED-NC Study Tips

Here are various study tips I’ve found from people online.  I actually am putting them on here so I can go through them later as well…. You’ll notice that they are pretty similar to each other.

Guide to Passing LEED V2.2 AP Test
1. Take the LEED course on TKN to get an overview of what LEED is all about.
2. Read the entire reference manual from cover-to-cover. Do not worry about the little details. Focus on understanding the Credit Intents, and what the goal is with regards to sustainability. Pay attention to the Synergies and Trade-off section in the credits where they exist. You need to be able to understand how achieving one credit may help contribute to achieving another credit, even if it is in a different section. Also, have a general understanding of the submittal requirements. Most of the credits ask for similar items.
3. Read through one section of the reference manual at a time. This time, focus on what is important for achieving the credit. Start to understand the Credit Requirements. Pay attention to which credits can earn an additional point for Exemplary Performance.
4. After you read through one section, as in step 3, immediately go back to the beginning of that section and begin reading again. This time Memorize the Credit Requirements. Learn what the Reference Standards are and what they pertain to. (Example: ASHRAE 55-2004 pertains to Thermal Comfort, ASHRAE 90.1-2004 pertains to Energy Efficiency). Also pay attention to the simple calculations you may have to make to determine if a scenario will qualify for a certain credit. (Example: How many showers do I need to for 100.000 FTE to satisfy SS Credit 4.2). I recommend highlighting the key words in the Credit Requirements for quick studying the day of the test. At this point you should feel comfortable with: Credit Intents, Credit Requirements, Required Submittals, Calculations to qualify for credits (not the complex formulae within the text), Synergies and Trade-offs, and Exemplary Performance (ID) credits.
(Note: If you have significant construction experience, thorough understanding of LEED with regards to Sustainability, or are pressed for study time: Skip step #2 and go directly to #3)
5. Take the LEED NC Sample Exam by Meghan Peot and Brennan Schumacher. It is located T:\Est_Purch Shared Files\Est\LEED INFO\LEED TEST QUESTIONS and is the LEED NC Sample Exam (2nd Edition)_S.pdf.
• Train yourself to take this 80 question test in around 50 minutes and definitely under an hour.
• Pay specific attention to what the question is asking. The question will have non-relevant information in it to try and confuse you.
• Assess you answers and understand what you got right and what you missed.
6. At this point, your Reference Manual should be marked up and highlighted for efficient studying. I recommend writing all of the percentages (%) required for each credit, as well as the Exemplary Performance (ID) %, on the “Overview” front page of each section, next to the credit overview.
Taking the Test
1. Schedule your test for an afternoon time slot so that you can cram during the morning.
2. Be sure you have read the Candidate Handbook and well as the CIR Guidelines Handbook.
3. 48-hours before the test you should be flipping through your highlighted manual paying specific attention to memorizing the Credit Requirements. You should be able to make your way through the entire manual in about an hour, reinforcing the main topics: Credit Intents, Credit Requirements, Required Submittals and Responsible Parties, Calculations to qualify for credits (Memorizing the % required will allow you to do calculations from a given scenario), Synergies and Trade-offs, and Exemplary Performance (ID) credits.
4. The day of the test: Run through the reference manual again. Next, go over the practice exam to get warmed for answering questions. If you have time after that, just keep flipping through your highlighted manual. At this point be sure to have the Credit Requirements memorized, the percentages required to qualify for the credit, as well as the Exemplary Performance percentages.
5. Here is how I took the exam and would recommend you do the same:
• Since you have trained yourself to take the practice exam in under an hour, you need to do the same with the actual test.
• Go through and answer every question the first time.
• Put a marker Flag on any and every question you are not 100% certain on.
(I flagged at least 45 questions so don’t hesitate to flag many of them)
• When you reach the last question you should have at least an hour or more still remaining in the test.
• Go back through all of the questions you flagged. Read the question again and be sure you are clear about what it is asking. You can eliminate many answer choices by realizing that they do not pertain to what the question is asking.
a. You may realize that you will need to change your answer selection from what you originally chose, and that is ok. Eliminate as many choices as you can, and make a confident selection.
1. If you still have more time, start from the beginning and run through all of the questions one last time. You may recall something that you did not at the beginning of the test. (I went through most all of the questions three times to ensure I had correct answers).
2. Good luck! Be confident! It is not a hard test if you have prepared, but it is quite tricky so be very discerning when you read the question and answer choices. The questions will try to confuse and trick you with non-relevant information, so be wary of this.

Guide to Passing LEED V2.2 AP Test1. Take the LEED course on TKN to get an overview of what LEED is all about.2. Read the entire reference manual from cover-to-cover. Do not worry about the little details. Focus on understanding the Credit Intents, and what the goal is with regards to sustainability. Pay attention to the Synergies and Trade-off section in the credits where they exist. You need to be able to understand how achieving one credit may help contribute to achieving another credit, even if it is in a different section. Also, have a general understanding of the submittal requirements. Most of the credits ask for similar items.3. Read through one section of the reference manual at a time. This time, focus on what is important for achieving the credit. Start to understand the Credit Requirements. Pay attention to which credits can earn an additional point for Exemplary Performance.4. After you read through one section, as in step 3, immediately go back to the beginning of that section and begin reading again. This time Memorize the Credit Requirements. Learn what the Reference Standards are and what they pertain to. (Example: ASHRAE 55-2004 pertains to Thermal Comfort, ASHRAE 90.1-2004 pertains to Energy Efficiency). Also pay attention to the simple calculations you may have to make to determine if a scenario will qualify for a certain credit. (Example: How many showers do I need to for 100.000 FTE to satisfy SS Credit 4.2). I recommend highlighting the key words in the Credit Requirements for quick studying the day of the test. At this point you should feel comfortable with: Credit Intents, Credit Requirements, Required Submittals, Calculations to qualify for credits (not the complex formulae within the text), Synergies and Trade-offs, and Exemplary Performance (ID) credits.(Note: If you have significant construction experience, thorough understanding of LEED with regards to Sustainability, or are pressed for study time: Skip step #2 and go directly to #3)5. Take the LEED NC Sample Exam by Meghan Peot and Brennan Schumacher. It is located T:\Est_Purch Shared Files\Est\LEED INFO\LEED TEST QUESTIONS and is the LEED NC Sample Exam (2nd Edition)_S.pdf.• Train yourself to take this 80 question test in around 50 minutes and definitely under an hour.• Pay specific attention to what the question is asking. The question will have non-relevant information in it to try and confuse you.• Assess you answers and understand what you got right and what you missed.6. At this point, your Reference Manual should be marked up and highlighted for efficient studying. I recommend writing all of the percentages (%) required for each credit, as well as the Exemplary Performance (ID) %, on the “Overview” front page of each section, next to the credit overview.Taking the Test1. Schedule your test for an afternoon time slot so that you can cram during the morning.2. Be sure you have read the Candidate Handbook and well as the CIR Guidelines Handbook.3. 48-hours before the test you should be flipping through your highlighted manual paying specific attention to memorizing the Credit Requirements. You should be able to make your way through the entire manual in about an hour, reinforcing the main topics: Credit Intents, Credit Requirements, Required Submittals and Responsible Parties, Calculations to qualify for credits (Memorizing the % required will allow you to do calculations from a given scenario), Synergies and Trade-offs, and Exemplary Performance (ID) credits.4. The day of the test: Run through the reference manual again. Next, go over the practice exam to get warmed for answering questions. If you have time after that, just keep flipping through your highlighted manual. At this point be sure to have the Credit Requirements memorized, the percentages required to qualify for the credit, as well as the Exemplary Performance percentages.5. Here is how I took the exam and would recommend you do the same:• Since you have trained yourself to take the practice exam in under an hour, you need to do the same with the actual test.• Go through and answer every question the first time.• Put a marker Flag on any and every question you are not 100% certain on.(I flagged at least 45 questions so don’t hesitate to flag many of them)• When you reach the last question you should have at least an hour or more still remaining in the test.• Go back through all of the questions you flagged. Read the question again and be sure you are clear about what it is asking. You can eliminate many answer choices by realizing that they do not pertain to what the question is asking.a. You may realize that you will need to change your answer selection from what you originally chose, and that is ok. Eliminate as many choices as you can, and make a confident selection.1. If you still have more time, start from the beginning and run through all of the questions one last time. You may recall something that you did not at the beginning of the test. (I went through most all of the questions three times to ensure I had correct answers).2. Good luck! Be confident! It is not a hard test if you have prepared, but it is quite tricky so be very discerning when you read the question and answer choices. The questions will try to confuse and trick you with non-relevant information, so be wary of this.

The most import things to know are the intent, requirements, referenced standards (yes you do need to know the difference between ASHRAE 90.1 and ASRAE 55), calculations, and submittal documentation required. You only need to know as much about the referenced standards as is provided by the reference guide, so don’t worry about studying the intricate details of SCAQMD Rule 1168, but do know that it applies to sealants and adhesives for EQc4.1. Don’t forget to learn the exemplary performance thresholds either. for each credit, Who is responsible for which credit (architect, owner, engineer, contractor, etc)

The difference between regular credits, innovation in design credits, and exemplary performance and knowing ALL of the percentages… knowing the difference between these can mean passing or failing. ASHRAE Standards and which credits they apply to… these are simple to memorize, but totally worth spending time getting to know these well. You don’t have to necessarily read the standards, but know what credits they apply to and how they are used (thermal comfort, MERV filters, ventilation, energy, etc)
Pay special attention to MR credits (Materials and Resources) and which materials you can include/exclude for each category I was asked a handful of questions about VOC-emitting materials… know your EQ category well.

November 8, 2009 Posted by | Construction, LEED | | Leave a comment

LEED-NC Study Resources

I came across this a fantastic blog http://www.reallifeleed.com that had some great study tips and resources to other LEED Study materials.   Check out some of the resources this fellow mentions.
  • IntheLEED.com – This was a blog by a guy named Pat who decided to just blog about his experience studying for the exam. The result is a site chock full of tips, tricks, cheat sheets, etc. that is all available free of charge. I would say this should be your first stop, and if you have any questions email him and not me…
  • AREforum.org – This site is setup to be a forum for people studying for the architectural registration exam, but they have a section devoted to LEED that is well trafficked. If you’re searching for a used reference guide or get stuck trying to find an answer to a practice question this is the place to go. You’ll even see my humble mug answering questions when I can… I also recommend taking a look at all the “brain dumps” you’ll see from people who just passed or failed the test (about a 50/50 split)…
  • Building Green Suite Practice Exam – I really like BGS, as can be evidenced by this post. They have written a free practice exam (see comments on the linked page for a few bugs), which I always recommend people taking before they take the real test. The level of detail necessary to pass can be an eye opener for many.

Here are some other sites I’ve found:

November 8, 2009 Posted by | Construction, LEED | | Leave a comment

Introduction to Green Construction Video 101

studying for my LEED AP Exam so I’ve been hunting for some great resources.

I found this Video helpful as a great introduction to green building.

http://www.greenexamprep.com/course/introtogreenbuilding/

Hope you enjoy the video, and if your in the process of doing your LEED AP, have a look at this site; I found it helpful: http://www.leedforcontractors.com

November 8, 2009 Posted by | Community Economic Development (CED), Construction, LEED, Sustainability | , , , , | Leave a comment

HRTC (Home RenovationTax Credit)

It applies to work performed or goods acquired after January 27, 2009, and before February 1, 2010

The HRTC applies to eligible expenses of more than $1,000, but not more than $10,000, resulting in a maximum non-refundable tax credit of $1,350 [($10,000 − $1,000) × 15%].

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/hrtc/

Examples of Eligable Expenses

  • Renovating a kitchen, bathroom, or basement
  • Windows and doors
  • New flooring – carpet, linoleum, hardwood, floating laminate, etc.
  • New furnace, woodstove, boiler, fireplace, water softener, water heater, or oil tank
  • Permanent home ventilation systems
  • Central air conditioner
  • Permanent reverse osmosis systems
  • Septic systems
  • Wells
  • Electrical wiring in the home (e.g., changing from 100 amp to 200 amp service)
  • Home security system (monthly fees do not qualify)
  • Solar panels and solar panel trackers
  • Painting the interior or exterior of a house
  • Building an addition, garage, deck, garden/storage shed, or fence
  • Re-shingling a roof
  • A new driveway or resurfacing a driveway
  • Exterior shutters and awnings
  • Permanent swimming pools (in ground and above ground)
  • Permanent hot tub and installation costs
  • Pool liners
  • Solar heaters and heat pumps for pools (does not include solar blankets)
  • Landscaping: new sod, perennial shrubs and flowers, trees, large rocks, permanent garden lighting, permanent water fountain, permanent ponds, large permanent garden ornaments
  • Retaining wall
  • Associated costs such as installation, building plans, permits, professional services, equipment rentals, and incidental expenses
  • Fixtures – blinds, shades, shutters, lights, ceiling fans, etc.

Note
Window coverings, such as blinds, shutters and shades, that are directly attached to the window frame and whose removal would alter the nature of the dwelling are generally considered to be fixtures (i.e. have become part of the home) and therefore would qualify for the HRTC. In some circumstances, draperies and curtains may qualify for the HRTC, if they would not keep their value or usefulness if installed in another dwelling. If these qualifying criteria are not met, it is likely that draperies and curtains would not qualify for the HRTC.

Examples of ineligible expenses

  • Furniture, household appliances, and electronic home-entertainment devices
  • Purchasing of tools
  • Carpet cleaning
  • House cleaning
  • Maintenance contracts (e.g., furnace cleaning, snow removal, lawn care, and pool cleaning)
  • Financing costs
  • Amount paid as part of the purchase of your new house, including “upgrades”
  • Expenses to acquire goods that have been previously used or leased by you or an eligible family member (e.g., hot water tank)
  • Expenses encurred to the rental and/or business part of an eligible dwelling

Do it yourself

If you do the work yourself, the eligible expenses include expenses for building materials, fixtures, equipment rentals, building plans and permits. However, eligible expenses would not include the value of your labour or tools.

November 1, 2009 Posted by | Construction | | Leave a comment

What are Submittals (Construction Management)

Submittals in Construction Management are shop drawings, material data, and samples. Product data submittals, samples, and shop drawings are required primarily for the architect and engineer to verify that the correct products will be installed on the project.[1]

This process also gives the architect and sub-consultants the opportunity to select colors, patterns, and types of material that were not chosen prior to completion of the construction drawings. This is not an occasion for the architect to select different materials than specified, but rather to clarify the selection within the quality level indicated in the specification.

November 1, 2009 Posted by | Construction, LEED | | Leave a comment

Water Efficient Irrigation

Water Efficient Irrigation Covers 7 Basic Steps:

  1. Planning & Design
  2. Preparing the Soil
  3. Creating Practical Turf Areas
  4. Water Efficient Plants
  5. Using Mulch
  6. Efficient Irrigation
  7. Proper Maintenance

 

October 31, 2009 Posted by | LEED | | Leave a comment

What is Brownfield Redevelopment?

CMHC

Brownfield redevelopment is a form of sustainable development, offering opportunities to revitalize older neighbourhoods, lower municipal infrastructure costs, increase municipal property tax revenues and lessen urban sprawl. Despite the obstacles facing this type of development, successful redevelopment projects have been built across Canada. These case studies are successful examples of residential projects that have overcome the barriers to brownfield redevelopment

Case Study: http://www.cmhc.ca/en/inpr/su/sucopl/upload/Brownfield-Redevelopment-for-Housing-in-canada-Case-Studies-London-Landing-Richmond-BC.pdf

October 30, 2009 Posted by | Community Economic Development (CED), Construction, LEED, Sustainable Community Development | | Leave a comment