Son of Five Rivers Blog

For the advancement of Entrepreneurship, Sustainability & the Ecology of Everyday Life

Simple Climate Protection Action Tips

CLIMATE PROTECTION ACTION TIPS
Small steps to help make Vancouver the cleanest, greenest, healthiest city in the world.
ON THE ROAD
Leave your car at home
If you drive to work fi ve days a week, leaving
your vehicle at home for one of those
days means you cut your driving by 20%.
Infl ate your tires
An improperly infl ated tire can reduce fuel
economy, increase tire wear and could be a
safety hazard. Your vehicle’s recommended
tire pressures can normally be found inside
the driver’s door frame or on the fuel cap.
The pressure shown on the tire itself is
a maximum safe pressure, not the
recommended pressure.
Stop idling
Idling will waste more fuel than turning
off your engine and restarting it. Idling
can lead to maintenance problems, engine
deposits and a fi ne from the City.
Buy a fuel effi cient car
You can save thousands of dollars on your
vehicle’s purchase price as well as annual
fuel bills by buying a smaller, more effi cient
daily-use vehicle.
FACTSHEET
SIGN UP ONLINE TO BE PART OF ONE DAY
Make One Day part of your life.
You will get a monthly email containing
easy action tips and the latest updates.
For more tips visit
AT HOME
Install a programmable thermostat
or lower it by 3°C
For every 1°C you lower your thermostat,
you save 2–3% on your heating bill.
Programmable thermostats are easy to install.
Install low-fl ow shower heads
Hot water accounts for a quarter of home
energy use and hot showers are a main
culprit. A low-fl ow shower head uses 60%
less hot water and could save you $200/
year.* Vancouverites can get a complete
water saver kit from City Hall for only $12.
Switch to cold water washing
Between 80 and 90% of the energy used
to wash clothes goes into heating water.
New detergents have been developed to
work in colder water.
Get an home energy evaluation
A home energy evaluation will give you
unbiased and professional advice on what
you can do to reduce your monthly utility
bills while making your home more comfortable
and healthier at the same time.

Small steps to help make Vancouver and it’s suburbs the cleanest, greenest, healthiest city in the world.

ON THE ROAD

  • Leave your car at home If you drive to work fi ve days a week, leaving your vehicle at home for one of those days means you cut your driving by 20%.
  • Infl ate your tires An improperly infl ated tire can reduce fuel economy, increase tire wear and could be a safety hazard. Your vehicle’s recommended tire pressures can normally be found inside the driver’s door frame or on the fuel cap. The pressure shown on the tire itself is a maximum safe pressure, not the recommended pressure.
  • Stop idling Idling will waste more fuel than turning off your engine and restarting it. Idling can lead to maintenance problems, engine deposits and a fi ne from the City. Buy a fuel effi cient car You can save thousands of dollars on your vehicle’s purchase price as well as annual fuel bills by buying a smaller, more effi cient daily-use vehicle.

AT HOME

  • Install a programmable thermostat or lower it by 3°C  For every 1°C you lower your thermostat, you save 2–3% on your heating bill.  Programmable thermostats are easy to install.
  • Install low-fl ow shower heads Hot water accounts for a quarter of home energy use and hot showers are a main culprit. A low-fl ow shower head uses 60% less hot water and could save you $200/year. In Vancouver you can get a complete water saver kit from City Hall for only $12.
  • Switch to cold water washing Between 80 and 90% of the energy used to wash clothes goes into heating water. New detergents have been developed to work in colder water.
  • Get an home energy evaluation A home energy evaluation will give you unbiased and professional advice on what you can do to reduce your monthly utility bills while making your home more comfortable and healthier at the same time.

September 11, 2009 Posted by | LEED, Sustainable Community Development | Leave a comment

Mandatory Electric Vehicle Charging

PluginElectric Vehicle Charging:
Vancouver City Council has approved a by-law amendment to requires electric charging infrastructure for 20% of the parking stalls in new condo buildings, as well as a public charging pilot.

Read the Full Report from the City of Vancouver Website:

http://vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/documents/penv3.pdf

September 11, 2009 Posted by | Construction, LEED, Sustainable Community Development | , , , , | Leave a comment

Carrall Street Green Way – Vancouver

The Carrall Street Greenway is a major public realm, community building and economic revitalization initiative.

The route will link north False Creek with the Burrard Inlet, completing a seawall loop around Downtown and Stanley Park, and connecting a series of parks, plazas and historic sites in Gastown, Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and Chinatown.

Beyond providing a pedestrian and cyclist-friendly transportation corridor, the greenway will also connect and build on the unique heritage character of these neighbourhoods, encourage active ground floor uses, and serve as a catalyst for economic revitalization and community development in the inner-city of Vancouver.

PROJECT SUPPORT
This project has received significant support from the public and private sectors as well as the local communities. The City of Vancouver has approved $5 million for the Carrall Street Greenway in the 2006-2008 capital budget plan. As well, the Vancouver Agreement partners and Bell Canada have committed $300,000 to the project as part of the Downtown Eastside Economic Revitalization Plan.

THE GREENWAY
The Carrall Street Greenway is a major public realm, community building and economic revitalization initiative. It is being designed to reflect the diversity of activities, cultures and communities in the Downtown Eastside. The greenway incorporates green infrastructure, facilitates private investments, and provides opportunities for social services, arts and culture programming to help achieve environmental, economic, social and cultural sustainability for the area.

Keefer to PenderExpo to Keefer

September 11, 2009 Posted by | Sustainable Community Development | , | Leave a comment

Bike bridge linking south Vancouver and Richmond now open

A bridge for cyclists and pedestrians moving between south Vancouver and Richmond across the north arm of the Fraser River has opened — to rave reviews.

A new $10-million bike and pedestrian route linking Richmond and Vancouver will opened along with the Canada Line, Metro Vancouver’s new rapid-transit route.

The one-kilometre route hangs beneath the Canada Line’s North Arm Bridge, which connects the Bridgeport and Marine Drive stations across the Fraser River south of Vancouver.

Arno Schortinghuis, president of the Vancouver Area Cycling Coalition, said he’s pleased to see the new bridge will keep cyclists away from traffic and out of the rain.

September 11, 2009 Posted by | Sustainability, Sustainable Community Development | , , | Leave a comment

The Case for Seperated Bike Lanes – NYC

We’ve seen the painted bike lanes and we’ve seen how ineffective they are as well.   motorists use them a parking and loading zones.  The idea behind this video is to just make it safer by putting a space between cars and bikes.

What the streets should look like: Side Walk, Bike Lane a barricade or green space Car Parking & Then the Road.

September 11, 2009 Posted by | 1 | | 1 Comment

Millennium Pedestrian Bridge – London

London jumped ahead as a sustainably commuting city when they built the Millennium Bridge in 1999-2000. The bridge is located in the ‘A list’ of London attractions, the bridge is a 330m steel bridge linking the City of London at St. Paul’s Cathedral with the Tate Modern Gallery at Bankside.

London, England: Millennium ('Wobbly') Bridge (1998-2002, Norman Foster and Partners and Arup Associates)

Millennium Bridge at night, looking at St Pauls from the south bank, London 2003

The twin ramps at the south end of the bridge!

One of the tapering elliptical piers under construction, Millennium Bridge, London

September 11, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

Concept Vancouver Bike Bridge – $45 Million

Mayor Gregor Robertson is supporting a proposal to build a bike and pedestrian bridge across False Creek at a cost of $45 million.

The proposed 15-metre-wide suspension bridge would cross the entrance to False Creek just west of Burrard Street, linking Kitsilano at Vanier Park with the West End at Sunset Beach.

Architect Gregory Henriquez presented the plan to the mayor after the two talked about the idea a few months ago.

The proposed span was “very elegant and modern,” according to Robertson, who compared it to the popular pedestrian-only Millennium Bridge that crosses the Thames River in London.

“It’s an infrastructure project and these kinds of bridges have actually been quite positive economic generators in London and Paris and we would be among the leading cities in North America to do something like this,” said Robertson on Thursday night after the proposal was publicly released.

Taxpayers could vote on the idea during a referendum in the next civic election, said Robertson, who is also hoping the federal and provincial governments will help with funding.

“It could be a business venture all of its own in terms of the money side of it. In terms of the long-term solutions we do have to have a long-term safe and good crossing of False Creek,” said Robertson.

Architect Gregory Henriquez's proposal for a pedestrian bridge across False Creek that would connect Kitsilano with the West End.

Source: CBC

September 11, 2009 Posted by | Sustainable Community Development | , | Leave a comment

Burrard Bridge Bike Lane Trial – Vancouver

bridge

This is an interesting project, and I hope people get out of their cars and take advantage of the temporary bicycle lane on the Burrard street bridge.   Here’s a direct link to the city of Vancouver website if you would like to leave a comment in support of the trial bridge.  http://vancouver.ca/projects/burrard/index.htm

Map

September 11, 2009 Posted by | Sustainability, Sustainable Community Development | | Leave a comment